Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.

Commissioned by the Secretariat for the Broadcast and Telecommunications Legislative Review, this report provides a comparative analysis of funding mechanisms for audiovisual local news in Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Republic of Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.

Based on a review of literature the research aimed to provide the following information:

  • Brief descriptions of the local broadcasting environment in each jurisdiction, and
  • Detailed descriptions of support mechanisms for local news and the organizations administering them in each jurisdiction.

A copy of the study can be requested at this link.

Commissioned by the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, this study examined the funding mechanisms that exist in support of domestic audiovisual sectors in seven jurisdictions selected amongst Canada’s peer nations: the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, France, Belgium, Germany, Norway, and Australia.  Based on a review of literature, the following was examined for each jurisdiction:

  • Information on national funding organizations that allocate funding for domestic audiovisual content, including their governance structure and how they are funded (e.g. parliamentary appropriations and/or regulatory contributions);
  • Eligibility criteria for funding; and
  • Information on direct and indirect (fiscal incentives) funding support provided.

The study can be requested at this link.

 

 

The 6th volume in the series Getting Real: An Economic Profile of the Canadian Documentary Industry. The report is an in-depth look at the state of Canadian documentary production from 2012-2013 to 2016-2017 in both the English- and French-language markets.

For this study, the consultants analyzed current statistics and provided a wealth of information on the financing, production, and viewing of documentaries in Canada. Focusing on television and theatrical documentaries, this report traces developments in funding and policy that affect production.

Through examining documentary production by format, language, and region, the report presents a longitudinal overview of developments and growth in the industry, supplemented by case studies. The report can be accessed at this link.

This study was prepared for the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Cultural Promotion and Diversity in the Digital Age Working Group, representing the cultural ministries of the federal, provincial and territorial governments in Canada. The report presents the findings of an assessment conducted of cultural promotion and export initiatives in Canada. The report is expected to inform future research on the diversity of digital Canadian content and opportunities and challenges in the international market.

The project scope entailed the development of an inventory of strategies and initiatives that support Canadian cultural promotion and export, and to identify gaps and emerging or new markets and opportunities in selected cultural sectors and provide considerations and potential next steps with respect to a potential promotion or export approach.

 

The Canada Council for the Arts retained the services of Communications MDR, in collaboration with Goss Gilroy Inc., to design and implement six online, quantitative and qualitative surveys, in English and French, to collect data from grant recipients of the Canada Council’s six primary programs. The goal of the surveys was to measure program performance against anticipated outcomes, including benefits to grant recipients, and to demonstrate the impact of the Council’s investment more broadly. A series of six program performance reports were developed by Communications MDR based on the findings of each survey.

This report prepared for the imagineNATIVE Institute presents findings of a major examination of Indigenous screen-based content internationally, the factors contributing to its success and lessons to expand opportunities for Canadian Indigenous screen-based productions in the global market. It reveals a growing demand for Indigenous screen content. Furthermore, the number of festivals dedicated to Indigenous content is growing and 76% of Indigenous festivals worldwide present Canadian productions.  This report is based on interviews with industry players, surveys of Indigenous festivals and alternate distribution networks, studies of national and international literature and case studies from Canada and around the world. To read the full report, click here.

The Indigenous Screen Office mandated Communications MDR to review the Canada Media Fund’s Aboriginal Program, which supports Indigenous-language television productions, with the goal of ensuring that the Program meets the needs of the Indigenous audio-visual production industry. The review involved a statistical analysis of program data and consultations with 25 Indigenous producers and other stakeholders. The report was published by the Indigenous Screen Office and can be accessed at this link.

For this project the consultants developed a communications plan to ensure a successful release of the Canada Council for the Art’s Qualitative Impact Framework, a ground-breaking initiative designed to enable the Canada Council to measure and report on the qualitative impacts of its funding on artists, arts organizations and on Canadians. In addition to the plan, the consultants also developed a series of communications tools, including a press release, a blog post and a web page for the publication of the Framework, which can be accessed at this link.

This comprehensive study undertaken for the Canadian Media Producers Association examines current global trends and emerging opportunities with respect to exports of Canadian television programs supported by the Canada Media Fund. The report makes recommendations to stimulate greater exports of Canadian television programs.

Acess the report here.